Top 10 Ridiculous College Fashion Trends for Girls

I’ve been working on a SEC college campus for 28 years and had 2 daughters attend college. I’ve seen trends come and go. But, one thing remains consistent – college fashion trends make no sense! And most importantly, students want to fit in and be comfortable.

College Freshmen

As a new college freshman, you will want to look “cute” going to class. I get it.

But, you will soon realize that sleeping that extra hour is better than getting up early, putting on makeup, fixing your hair and wearing a cute outfit that is truly more uncomfortable than you are willing to admit.

Plus, if you attend college in the south your makeup will sweat off before your 2nd class of the day and you will be sweating through that cute outfit! It’s not worth it.

If you want to be comfortable and “look” like a college freshman, follow this list – it is all true. I know it is hard to believe that someone my age (50 years old) can know more about college fashion trends than you. But it’s not that difficult. Trust.

Parents

Don’t bother with a new wardrobe for your college freshman. She will need new things to follow college fashion trends, but it may not be what you think. Read the list below and prepare to be amazed.

The Top 10 Ridiculous College Fashion Trends

1 – THE SRAT Uniform – The perfect outfit pairing is athletic running shorts and a HUGE t-shirt that covers your shorts. It gives the illusion that you have nothing under your t-shirt. Classic. Ignore faculty and staff who don’t understand this look.

Fraternity = FRAT

Sorority = SRAT

I don’t make the rules of abbreviations, I just share them so that you are as perplexed as I am.

2 – Leggings – enough said. They are your lifeline.

3 – Never underestimate the value of a HUGE sweatshirt – It can cover a multitude of sins from the night before and is just plain comfy during class.

4 – The Walk of Shame clothes. See #3 in this list.

Parents, it’s best you not know everything.

5 – Football Game Attire. You will want something new for the football games especially if you are a student at an SEC school. Hopefully, you will not wear high heels to a football game – you don’t need “hooker” shoes to look cute or attract a cute guy. You will enjoy the game better.

Extra Bonus Tip: Sunscreen is a MUST for day games. You’re welcome.

6 – Wear panties, not a thong – If your skirt is super short, wear panties for goodness sake! If someone could see your “privates” when you bend or sit, a thong just won’t cut it. This is especially true for football games.

7 – Wear a slip – if you don’t know what a slip is, Google is your friend. There’s nothing worse than a cute clingy dress (see Football Attire and Sunday Church Attire) and then you see unproperly fitted panties. I don’t care if you are a size 0, your panty lines are showing and a slip will give you a “cleaner” look under your dress unless you want people to know your panties don’t fit correctly.

8 – Sunday Church Attire – By all means, go to church in your lowest cut, highest skirt possible (aka “hooker” dress). Then, make sure you pair it with a ridiculously high heeled pair of wedge shoes. (See items referring to panties and a slip).

9 – Uggs are still in fashion in cold weather. If you don’t have real Uggs, the splurge will be worth it. They will last 4 years and are really comfy.

10 – Choco’s or Nike Running Shoes – No socks ever. Choco’s when it’s steamy and sticky outside. Nike running shoes any time of the year.

Take this list in the spirit in which it was written – fun! I enjoy working on a college campus and the students never age. They will always be 18 years old and I grow older each year.

Festival Chic for Plus Size Women – Top 5 Tips – Summer Fashion Trends

No, we’re not talking wellies at Glasto, don’t panic! We’re using Festival Chic in a fashion trend rather than a literal sense!

We’re talking about that carefree, relaxed, effortless sort of look that the glossy mags would have you believe everyone is rocking at the summer festivals. (The reality, is most are probably wearing huge sunglasses to cover 2 day old mascara and big floppy hats to hide greasy festival hair!).

That said, festival chic, or boho-chic, or hippy chick style, or boheme style depending on what era’s fashion magazines you’re reading, is a perennial favourite for a reason. It’s easily achievable, perfect for summer, and ultimately, it looks great and it works really well for girls needing plus size clothing.

And, it’s for everyone. Even if you have no desire to stand in a field or queue for a questionable port-a-loo, you can definitely still indulge in a spot of festival fashion – even if your idea of outdoorsy is just a barbeque in the comfort of your own back garden!

So, here are our top tips to inject a little festival style into your wardrobe.

Plus Size Clothing Festival Chic Tip 1

Layers are Lovely: Think pretty summer dress with a cute vest peeking out underneath, perhaps a vintage denim waistcoat on top? (We love this one: Or, try layering two contrasting vest tops together with your favourite designer jeans (if you are a plus size try stretch jeans which have elastane woven in, usually about 2% of the fabric mix, perfect for girls with curves, very comfortable to wear and you’ll look fabulous!) – mix and match to your heart’s content.

Plus Size Dresses for Summer: Tip 2

Floral prints are your friend: Floral summer dresses are all over the high street right now, in all sorts of styles to suit everyone including plus size girls. Find one you love and have fun accessorising it dozens of different ways. Alternatively, spruce up plain outfits with delicate floral scarves, either loosely draped around your neck, or used as head scarves for real hippy style. Artificial flowers are in to – the bigger the better, in all the colours of the rainbow, clip them in your hair, on your jacket, on your bag, on your belt, let your imagination go wild!

Festival Foot Wear: Tip 3

Espadrilles are excellent: Espadrille’s are like a more grown up wedge, and they’re very now. As luck would have it, they’re also very comfy, so definitely worth investing in to wear with your festival inspired finds. They look best with shorter styles though – so if you’re happier in a midi/maxi style summer dress, you’re better off choosing some strappy wedges instead. But be wary of the weather, if it is going to be a muddy festival you either need to be prepared to throw away those espadrilles after the festival!

Vintage Style Summer Dresses: Tip 4

Vintage is in vogue: The reason most Boho-Babes look so individual, is because they really are – they spend hours scouring charity shops and vintage fairs for all the quirky elements to their perfect ensemble. If you don’t have time for that, don’t worry – a few carefully chosen new pieces can easily work together to create a vintage inspired illusion. A belt with an antique style buckle would look fabulous nipping in the waist of a floaty summer dress. Or a stretch denim waistcoat would work brilliantly over those layered vests to add a vintage looking twist.

Access(ories) All Areas: Tip 5

Accessories can make or break a festival inspired look. Take a simple sleeveless Plus Size Dress – it’s pretty, yes, but it’s not festival chic. Yet. Add a 60’s inspired floppy hat, some massive sunglasses, a string or two (or three) of beaded beauties, a funky belt (we recommend tan), a stack of boho bangles, and voila – true Glasto-style Glamour.

The most important key to the trend, is to make it your own. It’s all about being relaxed, comfortable in your own skin, and rocking your own style – whether that’s in a field into the wee small hours, or in your garden listening to your iPod!

So embrace your inner Festival Fashionista, strut your plus size style & have a fantastic summer!

Top Ten Fashion Trends From the 1940’s

Rationing:

World War II impacted virtually every aspect of American life and fashion was no exception. In 1942, the United States imposed a rationing system similar to the one Great Britain had implemented the previous year, limiting, among other things, the amount of fabric that could be used in a single garment. Materials including wool, silk, leather and a fledgling DuPont Corp. invention called nylon were diverted for use in uniforms, parachutes, shoelaces and even bomber noses.

Jackets could be no more than 25 inches in length, pants no more than 19 inches in circumference at the hem, belts no more than two inches wide and heels no more than an inch in height. Hemlines rose to the knee in an effort to conserve fabric. Buttons, cuffs, pockets and decorative details like ruffles and lace were used sparingly. Women wore shorter, boxy jackets for a V-shaped silhouette reminiscent of military uniforms. Even Hollywood traded elaborate costumes for simplified designs, a move many claimed lent movies a new air of realism.

Nylon:

As soon as it was introduced in 1938, women embraced synthetic nylon as a replacement for silk stockings. In the early 1940s, however, with silk already diverted to the war effort, the government recognized similar uses for nylon and commandeered it as well. Women responded by coating their legs in tan makeup and drawing lines up the backs of their calves to mimic seams. By the time the war ended and stockings returned to store shelves, nylon had become a generic term for hosiery.

Swing skirts.

The swing skirt had a round cut designed to look best in full jitterbug twirl. Swing skirts were a common sight on USO dance floors as young women danced with uniformed men to the jazzy horns that characterized the Big Band Era. Housewives were known to wear a more conservative version of the swing dress, sometimes in polka-dot or tiny floral prints.

Hats:

Hats became one of the few ways to express individual style with minimal resources. They were worn in a wide range of styles and personalized with scraps of foil, sequins, netting, paper and string.

Hair and makeup:

Hairstyles became more elaborate as women sought ways to contrast their dull wardrobes. Shoulder length or longer hair was rolled into complex shapes and secured with bobby pins. Screen sirens like Lauren Bacall, Veronica Lake and Rita Hayworth popularized side parts and finger waves. Makeup was dramatic, characterized by matte foundation, powder, heavy brows and bright scarlet lips.

Platform pumps:

The wartime shortage of leather and steel forced shoe designers to get more creative and, as a result, shoes were cobbled from materials ranging from crocodile hide to cork. Shoes were more utilitarian than stylish, with low heels and limited color choices. By the mid to late 1940s, platform pumps with high heels in T-straps, ankle straps or open toes had replaced the dowdy wedgie with its flat shape and thick cork soles.

Menswear as womens wear:

A number of men may have spent the first half of the 1940s in uniform, but their civilian clothes came in handy for the women who filled their home-front jobs. Women raided the closets of absent men and tailored the suits to fit themselves. McCalls even introduced a pattern aimed specifically at modifying a masculine suit to fit feminine curves. Suddenly, the sexually ambivalent look pioneered in the late 1930s by Katherine Hepburn and Marlene Dietrich was radical no more. The emergence of the dress pattern and electric sewing machine led women to make their own suits from scratch, opting for gabardine due to the scarcity of wool. Many with physically demanding factory jobs soon began wearing practical pants and Rosie the Riveter jeans.

Sweaters:

By the mid-1940s, many women had abandoned the single-piece corset in favor of panties and structured bras that lifted and accentuated the bust line. In 1946, a well-endowed Jane Russell appeared onscreen in a cantilever bra designed by Howard Hughes, prefiguring the bullet-bra 1950s and the reign of the sweater girl. Loose-fitting cardigans were also popular, particularly on college campuses.

Sportswear:

The virtual disappearance of French fashion houses during the war led American designers to explore their own creativity. Designers like Bonnie Cashin and Claire McCardell were instrumental in the creation of sportswear, that singularly American look featuring coordinated separates that could be worn in layers or in various combinations. The trend not only gave women increased options and made it appear as if they had more clothes than they actually did, but also blurred the line between couture and ready-to-wear by showing women they could be both chic and comfortable without spending a fortune.

The New Look:

By the late 1940s, women craved a return to glamor and designers obliged with swirling skirts and shimmering evening gowns inspired by film stars like Ingrid Bergman, Barbara Stanwyck and Joan Crawford.

In 1947, French couturier Christian Dior almost single-handedly brought an end to wartime austerity with a fashion line observers christened the New Look. Severe angles were replaced with curves, hemlines dropped back below the knee and skirts were generously draped. Structured undergarments were key to the New Look, which featured broad shoulders, cinched waists, emphasized bust lines and padded hips. The pencil skirt was a figure-hugging alternative to bouffant skirts. Men, too, longed for freedom from conservative tailoring in khaki and olive drab. They found relief in wide-legged trousers, full-length coats and suits in an array of colors. Both mens and womens trousers featured higher waists, widely cut legs and cuffs and came in textured tweeds and jewel tones.

The New Look met with protest from women who had grown accustomed to baring their legs and were disinclined to cover them back up. Moreover, the opulent, fabric-rich designs seemed wasteful in contrast to wartime fabric restrictions. The desire for change prevailed, however, and the look flourished throughout much of the 1950s.